Continuing, Jeanne Doré reminds us that some great male classics have very pronounced floral or gourmet notes such as “Fahrenheit, built on a violet, Dior Homme on an iris, and L’Homme Idéal has a very present almond cherry accord. Yet no one disputes their virility!

Valérie Pianelli-Guichard, for the perfume house Comptoir Sud Pacifique, recalls that since the 1990s, codes have become blurred and women are more and more appropriating masculine fragrances with happiness.

Mythical Amber of Master Perfumer and Glover

This trend is particularly visible in niche perfumery where, as our interlocutor at Maison Maître Parfumeur et Gantier points out, “customers have a more extensive perfume culture and therefore a more open mind. They “dare” more. In the case of niche fragrances, communication is very rarely done on the Men / Women olfactory difference, the bottles and boxes have the same shape ”. The distinction is made by families which bring together the different juices, which allows easier reading of the collection. At July st Barthélémy, two of the perfumes combine so-called feminine notes (flowery and powdery) with so-called masculine notes (vetiver), thus suited to the affinities of both sexes.

THE PURITY OF PERFUME HAS NO SEX BUT CONNECTED TO EMOTIONS WHICH, EITHER THEM, HAVE NO SEX. – ISABELLE MASSON-MANDONNAUD

On the other hand, for Valérie Pianelli-Guichard “today the trend towards” non-distinction “between perfumes for men and women has been accentuated by the fact that, more and more, we are trying to mark and differentiate personality thanks to a unique fragrance… women no longer hesitate to choose woody or leathery scents and men take pleasure in wearing floral notes such as orange blossom or rose! “

WEARED BY A MAN, MITSOUKO, FEMININITY OF WOOD OR THE NUMBER 5, IT’S SUPERB! – JEANNE DORÉ

In the same spirit, for Céline Verleure Founder / Creator Olfactive Studio Parfums, there are perfumes whose olfactory family is suitable for both men and women: woody, citrus (= citrus), spicy, oriental fragrances.

Isabelle Masson-Mandonnaud, founder of Sabé Masson perfumes, recalls that “from an alchemical point of view and ignoring marketing, the most important is the alchemy between the texture of the skin and the fragrance. Feminine scents on men’s skins are exceptional and take on a different color and vice versa. ”

For his part, Franck Bertolino of Terra Continens insists on a physiological fact on the perfume “the humidity and the temperature act and influence enormously the scents, adding to the body index an olfactory balance. For example, skin color in the broadest sense will need more or less olfactory force. If we add to this a diet specific to each tribe, the fragrance will be adapted and complementary, creating a harmony of the senses. “.

Diet, climate and skin type are more important than the kind of scent. He adds that “the perfume is a subjective and powerful message which suggests that there are only two use hypotheses,” balance “by equal notes and the perfume is unisex or” dominant dominated “with notes ranging from full-bodied to lightest, which translates for the dominant amber, powdery, peppery, and for the dominated, sweet, navy, floral. If we had to look, a third hypothesis would be the absence of perfume. “

For Nicolas Olczyk, this gender distinction of perfume “is very cultural. We associate vanilla or flowers with the feminine character, in the same way that we associate the color pink to girls and blue to boys. However, there are a lot of women who dress in blue and there are men who wear pink shirts. It’s the same with perfumes. There are also flowers in the masculine fragrances and more and more woody notes in the feminine creations. And then there are more mixed or rather unspecified fragrances today. “

THE PERFUME DOES NOT BELONG TO ANYONE, NOR WOMAN, NOR MAN, IT IS ONLY THE MOMENT PRESENT OF EVERYONE – FRANCK BERTOLINO

For Céline Verleure “the concept of feminine and masculine is different according to the geographical zones in the world. Guerlain’s Shalimar perfume is often worn by men in the Middle East… ”. Jeanne Doré confirms “all of this is very Western, in the Middle East or in India, men wear roses, and in Brazil, women love lavender!

It is entirely cultural, there is no odor “a priori” feminine or masculine, everything is linked to a long and complex evolution of uses, symbolism and cultures linked to the role of perfume, and hygiene “. Bettina Aykroyd adds that perfumes are “adapted” from one geo-cultural area to another for reasons of cultural habits, especially on the dosages of certain notes including the emblematic Oud!